Tag Archives: employee development

What is Your Employee Retention Strategy?

Successful business people celebrating with a high-five

Finding high quality candidates is a major concern for businesses these days.  Although we can’t change the fact that many Boomer employees are retiring or that people will leave their jobs for personal reasons, turnover can be significantly reduced by developing and implementing  employee retention strategies

Gallup’s State of the American Workforce Report gives detailed information about the relationship between employee engagement and employee retention.  Unfortunately, engagement is not increasing because many businesses and organizations are not prioritizing efforts to engage and retain their employees.

If your organization is being impacted by employee turnover and you are having a hard time filling your positions, it is essential to make engaging and retaining your employees a priority.  You can start by letting your employees know you value their contributions and gather their input as to what you can do to keep them long term.  You may also want to conduct a survey based on the engagement factors the Gallup Organization has identified as critical to employee retention.  When you make a plan to increase retention and take the steps necessary to implement this plan, you will see decreased turnover and reduce the need to fill open positions in this tight job market.

Alisa Blum & Associates helps businesses & organizations select, develop and retain top employees.  You may contact us for a complimentary consultation to discuss strategies  to retain your top talent at (503) 481-7586 or alisa@developtopemployees.com. Information about our services can be found at developtopemployees.com.

 

Are You Aware of the Impact Negative Stereotyping is Having on Millennials?

 

A recent report from Udemy, based on a survey of more than 1,000 Millennials across the U.S., found that 86 percent feel undermined by negative stereotypes in the workplace

I’ve spent many years providing training to help employees work better across generations.  Here are some ways I’ve found helpful in understanding Millennials and reducing negative stereotyping:

  1. Younger generations historically are the victims of negative stereotyping. If you are a Boomer, think back to how employers felt about your generation of hippies entering the workforce.  If you are a Gen X’er, you probably remember your generation being called  “slackers” when you entered the workforce.  You proved that you were productive employees and you will find that many young employees, if they have appropriate support, are and will become productive employees.
  2. Millennials are labeled as being too demanding when they are vocal about expressing their needs in areas such as equity, positive feedback and flexibility. Productivity and retention improve when employees feel supported and perceive they are being treated in an equitable manner. Listen to your employees and try to meet their needs.  When you can’t meet their requests, discuss the business rationale for doing so.
  3. Entitlement” is often confused with ambition.Employees from this generation may want to get promoted faster than those in older generations.  Rather than labeling them as “entitled”, they need to be given guidance about the skills needed to move to higher levels in the organization.
  4. Appreciating the unique contributions each individual makes can lessen the tendency to stereotype and enhance engagement.  Get to know your employees and determine how to leverage each individual’s strengths.

What do you think are the business costs of negative stereotyping?  What is your organization doing to address this?

I am very interested in your input on this topic.  Please feel free to leave a comment or get in touch with me here.

 

The Boomer Exodus & Millenial Explosion: 5 Strategies to Successfully Manage this Generational Transition

Mixed group business people

We are in the midst of huge demographic changes. Boomers are reaching retirement age at record rates.  Millennials will soon be the largest generation in the workforce. Many organizations today have a small window in which to pass on essential knowledge and evolve into the type of organization that is conducive to hiring and keeping a younger generation of top talent.

Here are some strategies that will help your organization to successfully manage this transition:

  1. Have career development discussions. It is essential to find out when your older employees are thinking about retiring and garner suggestions about how to best pass on their knowledge.       Discussions with younger employees is also imperative, as  younger employees are much more likely to stay at their current job if they have opportunities for career development.
  2. Determine which of your employees have the skills, motivation and interest level required to fill positions vacated by your retirees.   It can be extremely useful to develop benchmarks for the positions being vacated so that you can assess which of your current employees are able to fill positions that will soon be vacated. Then, assess current employees who you think could be qualified for these positions.
  3. Develop mentoring programs. Older workers tend to be motivated by having opportunities to pass on their knowledge. Younger workers enjoy the career development opportunities they gain as mentees while also learning critical skills needed to prepare for advancement.
  4. Create flexible work schedules. Many older workers either don’t want to retire full time or cannot afford to retire full time. Organizations can reap the benefits of their experience by creating part-time, on-call or consultant opportunities. Flexible work schedules are a highly effective way to retain employees from all of the generations as this provides them with a greater ability to manage work and family responsibilities.
  5. Move toward a collaborative organizational culture. Younger employees typically desire a flatter, more collaborative organization. In order to keep top young talent, it will be imperative to identify changes that need to be made in your organization to successfully create a collaborative organizational culture.

By implementing these strategies, you can prevent the potential loss of critical knowledge during the Boomer exodus, and can make sure you have successors in place to ensure your organization will grow and thrive.

Alisa Blum & Associates provides customized training programs, assessments, consultations, coaching and conference presentations to help organizations successfully work across generations.  You may contact Alisa for a complimentary consultation at alisa@developtopemployees.com or (503) 481-7586.

© 2018, Alisa Blum, Alisa Blum & Associates, www.developtopemployees.com

Take Vacation Time and Enhance Productivity at Work

Happy Romantic Couple Enjoying Beautiful Sunset at the Beach According to a survey by Glassdoor, “the average American employee only takes half of their earned paid time off, while 61% report they work while on vacation.”

We need to strongly consider the damaging effects this practice has on our physical and emotional well-being.  Numerous studies on brain functioning have found that we are much more productive and innovative when we take breaks.  In an article in the New York Times, essayist Tim Krieder wrote, “Idleness is not just a vacation, an indulgence or a vice; it is as indispensable to the brain as vitamin D is to the body, and deprived of it we suffer a mental affliction as disfiguring as rickets.  He goes on to say that “The space and quiet that idleness provides is a necessary condition for standing back from life and seeing it whole, for making unexpected connections and waiting for the wild summer lightning strikes of inspiration—it is, paradoxically, necessary to getting any work done.”

When contemplating your next vacation, consider that this vacation will improve your brain functioning, and therefore, improve productivity when you return to work.  And if you are an employer, encourage your employees to take what may be a long overdue vacation and insist they turn off the electronic leash.

Alisa Blum & Associates helps businesses and organizations develop top employees with programs that enhance motivation, productivity and retention. Alisa can be reached at (503) 481-7586 or alisa@developtopemployees.com to discuss your specific needs.

Retain Top Talent With These Three Questions

job interview-young employees

As Boomers retire and Millennials begin to dominate the workforce, it is essential for managers to retain top talent.  One of the best ways to keep top Millennial talent is to have frequent career development discussions.

Managers can initiate the career development discussion by asking their employees these three questions:

  1. In what areas of your work do you feel the most successful?
  2. What parts of your work give you the most satisfaction?
  3. What ideas do you have that would simultaneously create a career opportunity for you and increase the success of our organization?

Keep in mind that career development is a process.  Your employees will likely need time to reflect on these questions, and may need assistance to fully explore their career goals.  The manager’s role in this process is key because employees often are not likely to openly discuss their career aspirations without encouragement from their manager.   You will find that these discussions will go a long way to enhance motivation, increase productivity and reduce turnover.

Alisa Blum & Associates offers consulting, training and coaching to enhance motivation and improve productivity.  For questions about our services and schedule a free consultation, please contact Alisa at (503) 524-3470 or alisa@developtopemployees.com.